Fall Vegetable Planting

Fall Vegetable Planting

frost on brussel sprouts

Extend your growing season

Here in the Pacific Northwest, you can harvest crops every season of the year with some extra planning. The first step is selecting vegetable varieties that are well suited for fall and winter harvest. Some of the best vegetables are produced during the warm days and cool nights of fall. These conditions add sugar to corn and crispness to carrots. Other examples of crops that benefit from a touch of frost are parsnips, kale, collards, brussels sprouts, and Jerusalem artichokes.

Crops that endure the winter in mild areas of our region must be well established, but not mature prior to the colder days to come. For this reason, it is important to follow the recommended planting dates and get most winter crops in the ground during the specified month.

CROP

VARIETY

MINIMUM TEMP.

PLANTING DATE

Broccoli

Purple Sprouting

10° F.

August

Brussels Sprouts

Jade Cross “E”

10° F.

August-September

Cabbage

Cheers/Savoy Ace

10° F.

August-September

Cauliflower

Snow Crown

10° F.

August-September

Lettuce

Esmerelda

0° F.

August

Lettuce

Red Oak Leaf

15° F.

August & December/January

Onion

Walla Walla/Red Zeppelin

10° F.

August-September

Spinach

Tyee

0° F.

August

Swiss Chard

Bright Lights

10° F.

August

 

 vegetables in a raised bed

Tips for Success

  1. Select a warm location such as a south-facing slope that receives as much sun as possible. Avoid areas that are exposed to wind or prone to early frost.
  2. Prepare the soil for adequate drainage. Raised beds are a safe bet. Amend your soil with compost or peat moss, as well as add a complete fertilizer prior to planting. A good fertilizer to use is 16-16-16.
  3. Take extra care to water new transplants daily at first, especially if it is hot and sunny. Once the plants are established, add mulch to retain moisture and control weeds.
  4. Control snails and slugs in August and September.
  5. When thinning, leave additional space between plants that will remain close in the garden over the winter season. Closely spaced plants are more susceptible to rot, slug damage, and do not receive adequate air circulation.
  6. Prepare for frost and harvest all ripe crops before they become damaged. Tomatoes, melons, eggplants, cucumbers, peppers, and summer squash cannot withstand frost.

In all, cole crop fall and winter planting will help you extend your gardening season by allowing you to enjoy fresh vegetables every season of the year. Now is the time to get those seeds in the ground. Give yourself a bounty to look forward to in the months to come.


4 comments


  • Diane Lam

    Wonderful information. Have always wondered what could be done in the winter. Thank you!!


  • Arvidell D Cole

    Thank you! I was really hoping to still have some gardening time so this is great news!


  • Chuck Baker

    Read the article in your most recent e-mail and convinced me to try some fall lettuce (Esmerelda and Red Oak Leaf) and some spinach (Tyee).
    Do you have seeds available? Haven’t been able to find any – even on-line.
    Thanks for the help.
    Chuck B


  • Roger Williams

    Does Al’s have winter/overwinter vegetable plants?


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